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Protests in Baltimore, especially of late, often seem fractious, with certain groups not showing up if certain other groups are showing up and blah blah blah (although a series of marches lately, especially last Saturday's #AFROMATION suggest that Baltimore's protest movement has been reinvigorated).What was also interesting however, was that there was far less animosity towards police at this march, though we'd also point out that the police were far less aggressive here than in Baltimore (they also for the most part wore their nametags or had badge numbers visible).

Also: you really can't overstate how absurd these cops in all the protective gear look.

Given the spectacle-chasing nature of the week so far, at first we thought maybe it was group dressed up all "1984"-ish as some kind of performance art parody of the police state Trump's rise anticipates.

At the very back of the march, not far from the "Rollerball"-ish bike cops was Public Enemy frontman and now, frontman for Prophets Of Rage, Chuck D.

Yesterday around 4 p.m., the End Poverty Now Rally, a two-mile march to downtown Cleveland near the RNC began.

It followed a free performance by Prophets of Rage, the protest rap-rock group consisting of Chuck D of Public Enemy and B-Real of Cypress Hill and members Rage Against the Machine.

Also on the bill: Baltimore acts Son Of Nun (who performed his Kwame Rose speech-sampling, 'It's Like That' among others) and Ryan Harvey, as well as Rebel Diaz.

Featuring a bunch of activist organizations including the Revolutionary Communist Party and Code Pink, about 400 people marched.

Frequently at the front of the march was community activist El Hajj Amir Khalid A.

Samad leading the group with chants against poverty, abuse of taxpayer money, and more.

Ostensibly, this was a protest on behalf of the poor, though there was also plenty of talk from the group about Donald Trump and issues of police brutality—all of this stuff is tied together and systemic, all right?

The End Poverty Now Rally felt familiar to City Paper, though this march was more organized than most in Baltimore and there was more unity among the different groups.

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