Racial preference online dating

While he said white people were the most likely to consider relationships with people from other ethnic backgrounds, he said the biggest 'reversals' in preference, are observed among groups that display the greatest tendency towards in-group bias.

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* Asian, Hispanic and Caucasian women prefer Caucasian men while Caucasian men are more likely to respond to everyone but Caucasian women.

* Caucasian women are twice as likely to respond to Caucasian men than African-American men.

* African-American men are more likely to respond to women of different races but receive three times more responses from African-American women than a non-black woman.

* African-American women prefer all races over Caucasian men but are the least likely to get a response from all men.

“The big thing we’re learning is the difference between stated preference and actual behavior, and that’s a big deal,” First Data Analyst Josh Fischer said in an interview with USA Today.

That was the disclaimer that an Asian man sent to Rokashi Edwards, 25, a black programmer living in Toronto, before telling him that he would never consider having sex with a black man.

Shocked, Edwards tried to push back on the man’s claim that he wasn’t being racist but he ran up against the same obstacle that many gay men of color face in the world of online dating.

If you’re a gay man, phrases like “no blacks” and “no Asians” aren’t just words that you’d find on old signs in a civil rights museum, they are an unavoidable and current feature of your online dating experience.

On gay dating apps like Grindr and Scruff, some men post blunt and often offensive disclaimers on their profiles such as “no oldies,” “no fems,” and “no fatties.” Among the most ubiquitous are racial disclaimers like “no blacks” and “no Asians,” which are most frequently posted by white men but, as Edwards’s case proves, not always. ” Others have argued that it is impossible to separate the language of so-called sexual racism from racism in other spheres of life.

Those who deploy these disclaimers defend themselves from accusations of “racism” by claiming that they merely have “preferences” for certain races over others. There is a reason, they insist, that men of color are most often pushed to the sexual wayside. Debates around “sexual racism,” as researchers have labeled it, are particularly heated within the gay community, although it is certainly a source of controversy in heterosexual circles as well.

Wrote one gay blogger, “Don’t tell me I can’t have a preference! It is also an argument that could soon be settled by emerging sociological research.

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