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or cook book) is a kitchen reference publication that typically contains a collection of recipes.

Modern versions may also include colorful illustrations and advice on purchasing quality ingredients or making substitutions.

Many of these cookbooks, therefore, provide only limited sociological or culinary value, as they leave out significant sections of ancient cuisine such as peasant food, breads, and preparations such as vegetable dishes too simple to warrant a recipe.

The earliest collection of recipes that has survived in Europe is De re coquinaria, written in Latin.

An early version was first compiled sometime in the 1st century and has often been attributed to the Roman gourmet Marcus Gavius Apicius, though this has been cast in doubt by modern research. The current text appears to have been compiled in the late 4th or early 5th century; the first print edition is from 1483.

It records a mix of ancient Greek and Roman cuisine, but with few details on preparation and cooking.

In spite of its late date it represents the last manifestation of the cuisine of Antiquity.

The earliest cookbooks known in Arabic are those of al-Warraq (an early 10th-century compendium of recipes from the 9th and 10th centuries) and al-Baghdadi (13th century).

One of the earliest surviving Chinese-language cookbooks is Hu Sihui's "Yinshan Zhengyao" (Important Principles of Food and Drink), believed to be from 1330.

Hu Sihui, Buyantu Khan's dietitian and therapist, recorded a Chinese-inflected Central Asian cuisine as eaten by the Yuan court; his recipes were adapted from foods eaten all over the Mongol Empire.

Eumsik dimibang, written around 1670, is the oldest Korean cookbook and the first cookbook written by a woman in East Asia.

After a long interval, the first recipe books to be compiled in Europe since Late Antiquity started to appear in the late thirteenth century.

About a hundred are known to have survived, some fragmentary, from the age before printing.

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